Tagged: book review

The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion

rosie effect♦♦♦ I was pretty excited to win this book in a GoodReads contest, not just because I got a free book, but because I really was ready to read the second book. The first book, The Rosie Project, I totally adored. I couldn’t wait to read this one, but for some reason I just kept putting it off for other things. When it was delivered though, I dove right in. I’m not sure exactly what happened or why I just wasn’t thrilled with the sequel. It was still a good book, and there were some poignant moments, but it did’t have quite the same appeal. It seemed more contrived. I wonder if the it was because the first book was so refreshing and surprising in so many ways, and this one was nothing new? What I do love about these books are the characters.

Dead Eye by Mark Greaney

Dead Eye♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ The latest in the Gray Man series does not disappoint. I haven’t really been reading this year, which I hate, but there are only so many hours in the day. I’ve chosen other things this year. . . bucket list things, so a decent trade. However, my husband and I started this one just before we went on vacation. He loves the action and the gratuitous violence. I enjoy the action (but probably not the violence as much) and the story line. I thoroughly wallow in the depth of imagination and the art of story telling. Greaney’s Gray Man series, about an American (former CIA) assassin is well written. Every time I think that we’ve heard all there is, another awesome book comes out with a new twist and a story that keeps you on the edge of your seat. I say, “Just keep writing them Mark! My family will keep listening!”

All The Light We Cannot See

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ I expected to LOVE this book. I obviously loved it with a four star rating, but it wasn’t the best book of all time to me. I wonder if I’d read the print version, if I’d have loved it even more? Seems like I’ve read a lot of WWII books lately and the difference was that this one was told from a German point of view, and a French one. I loved that. There wasn’t much about the Holocaust, but the story was still a very human one. It definitely didn’t end the way I had longed for it to, but it was so much more realistic. This was not a fairy tale. Not really. A good story though, heartbreaking at times, buoyant at times too. I love books that are like real life. Brutal, honest and, well, you do the best with what you’re dealt. Misery, love, defeat, hate, ugliness and beauty, just like life. Yes. A definite read.

 

Book 36: In The Morning I’ll Be Gone

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Adrian McKinty does not disappoint me. Gerard Doyle as a narrator is just so natural! I loved this Sean Duffy series. Because my in laws live in Northern Ireland, I’m privy to know sources directly, and some of the geographical references are a wee bit off sometimes and there’s been license taken with historical facts in some cases, but we all agree that it’s great (and mostly accurate) historical fiction. Being a Texan, I eat these novels up. I find that they transport me into the history of Ireland that my husband lived. I know that they all loved the “Dallas” series back in the 80s and I know personally that a lot of that was total crap! It’s fun to know that the Troubles series is fairly accurate. I highly recommend this series! Start with The Cold, Cold Ground. You are welcome!

Book 35: Murder on the Orient Elite

orient elite♦ ♦ ♦ .5 This is a novella in the Grimnoir Chronicles and was written for Audible, so it’s only available in Audio format as far as I know. It’s a quick little story about what Jake Sullivan is up to these days. We enjoyed this (less than 4 hours I think) book and are anxiously awaiting the next full novel in the series. Thanks for the update Larry!

Book 34: Into The Storm

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 1/2 Any book that has an army regiment called “Madigan’s Malcontents” wins my vote. I really love the word malcontent and it was quite the fitting name for Madigan’s motley crew. They were an assortment of criminals, lowlifes and bad-asses who ended up, of course, coming together under the leadership of an outcast knight and turning into a group of real soldiers. This book had all kinds of action, fights, gambling, drinking, evil genius’, magic-ish people and huge war robots. My hubby and I listened to the book while we cooked, rode in the car and did chores around the house. We burned right through this one and both agreed on the 4.5 rating. I pretty much love most of what Larry Correia writes. We’ve enjoyed the Monster Hunter Series as well as the Dead Six series. We’ll just keep listening. Keep writing, Larry!

Book 33: Only Time Will Tell

book review, Adverb creative, Jeffery Archer book♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ This is the beginning of an epic series that drew me in quickly and kept me knowing I would find out the answer at any minute. I love the anticipation of knowing something that your character doesn’t. The novel starts in the 1920s and tells a story of struggle and triumph, mistakes and consequences. The class distinction of the titled and entitled is a hard line, a barrier. This is the stuff of mankind, maybe a part of being human; quite possibly as a species, we don’t learn and nothing changes? Archer tells the story from each main character’s viewpoint. I found it interesting to relive a scene from a different character’s perspective. It had been awhile since I had jumped into an historical fiction and I’m happily reminded that I love that genre. I’ll put The Sins of the Father on my to read list.

Book 32: On Target

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ This Gray man series has been a surprise. Mark Greaney, new to us author, has proven to be “on target” (sorry, puns are fun) when it comes to keeping us entertained. Always some sort of crazy twist, deception and lots of shooting when The Gray Man (an assassin) is involved. There’s some of what you don’t expect too. There are lines that this seemingly cold-blooded killer won’t cross, lows to which he will not stoop and triggers he just won’t pull.  Though we know his brutality runs just below the surface, we cheer for him anyway. We love him, and better still, we like him. This is the second book in the series and it did not disappoint. Enjoy, but start with The Gray Man.

Book 29: Monster

book review, good books, worth a read

♦ ♦ ♦ Here’s a book I read because it was a requirement for my kid’s freshman English class. I’d never heard of it, and he thought it was pretty decent, so I jumped in. The first thing that struck me was that the main character, a teenager, was in a position that is every mother’s nightmare. He’s been implicated in a crime and thrown in jail. He’s old enough to be in regular prison. As a mom, it freaked me out. The district attorney even calls him a monster, thus the title. I won’t ruin the book, it’s a short one, but suffice it to say that it will make you think. It will also make you examine your own feelings about people on trial. We are guaranteed the right to be “innocent until proven guilty.” Next time you’re watching the news and see that someone’s been arrested, dissect your thoughts about that person. It’s quite interesting. This book was good, not great, but worth a read. I might have given it two point five diamonds had it not been written from such an interesting point of view.

Book 28: Across The Nightingale Floor

book review, good books, AdVerb Creative♦ ♦ ♦ .5 I don’t think I’ve ever read/listened to a book set in Japan. I didn’t know what to expect, but this “Tales of the Otori” series was rated really highly on Audible. Over 6000 people gave it an average of 4 stars. So, we dipped in. It definitely took awhile for me to be fully engaged in the story. The language was lovely, the narration was good, so maybe I was just distracted. Eventually, though, I was pulled in. There’s magic, deception, fighting, special powers, romance and a floor that sings like a nightingale. There are pretty girls, swords, torture and loyalty which all turn into a surprisingly good read. Go get it!